Decentralized Distribution of Steam (DDoS)

  • I'm mostly just thinking out loud here, trying some 'outside the box' approaches to cooling nuclear reactors. One of these ideas, no clue how good it will actually be, involves a lot of coolant cells.


    Specifically, we use coolant cells to soak up the heat, then yank them out before they melt and replace them with fresh ones. Then we cool them down elsewhere.


    Now, Coolant Cells themselves eat up 4x Tin instead of 1/4 tin, so that's kind of painful in the amount we're talking about. Then it's 3x of them plus six more tin for a 30k coolant cell. Then, it's two of those, six MORE tin, and a dense copper plate for the 60k version.


    My plan is to look into the viability and cost efficiency of setting up a Continuously Applied Coolant Cell setup, much like the old CASUC reactors, either in sticking them in rapid cooling 'generators' or simply tossing them. Or, to apply a cute moniker, the Decentralized Distribution of Steam, since that's what ya get when ya heat water.


    Now let's talk about the cost of coolant cells. Since we're reusing them, it makes sense to use the biggest ones available, to minimize the amount of transfers made. So, per 60k coolant cell, you need 6 coolant cells, 12 tin, and 2 dense copper plates. So, 36 Tin and 16 Copper.


    So now let's start talking about cooling. Now, ideally, we're wanting to get away from heavy resources, that's why we're looking into this concept in the first place. However, that's actually probably possible, because we won't need to be using overclocked fans or advanced fans or anything.


    So what we would need for this concept to work:


    * Cheap, reliable coolant towers. No gold, no diamonds.


    * A method of getting used cells to said coolant towers.


    * A method of automating the above.


    Now, HAYO Corp has provided us with a design for a coolant tower which is quite potent, 80 cooling in a 2x4 grid. However, it requires gold and even diamonds, so that's probably not going to be practical for our considerations, even though it is very HAYO-ish.


    Now, just the coolant tower itself requires an investment of 52 Copper and 36 Iron. So, not *too* bad, in terms of resource. Something certainly reproducible, if not spammable.


    Regular heat vents require refined iron and four iron bars each. A Reactor Heat Vent takes one and a couple of Dense Copper Plates. An Overclocked Vent requires the reactor heat vent and a couple of gold. A Component Heat Vent eats up a basic vent, some tin, and some iron bars.


    A Heat Exchanger is a Dense Copper Plate, and Electric Circuit and three Tin. Not bad at all. Reactor heat exchanger takes two more dense copper plates, plus the above. A Component Heat Exchanger eats up a Heat Exchanger plus four gold.


    Now then, if we are cooling down nearly-dead coolant cells, then things that suck up hull heat are worthless to us, because there won't be any. So either Basic, Component, or Overclocked vents are the order for the day.


    So let's do a cost analysis.


    Basic heat vent is about... let's call it six iron, a bit less but I don't like dealing in fractions. It cools off 6 heat. So about a one iron per cooling ratio.


    Overclocked heat vent cools 20 heat. BUT, they require a basic heat vent, a couple of dense copper plates, and a couple of gold.


    I suppose at this point, you're going to be needing to look at your gold reserves. Personally, I hardly count the cost of copper, I have so much of it. If you are swimming in gold, don't sweat it. It's much more efficient, from an Iron standpoint, so gold is the only real factor to consider.


    Now, the Heat Exchangers are where this can get pricey. Basically, we'd normally want Component Exchangers, since we're not dealing with hull heat. Unfortunately, those are the ones that eat up four gold *EACH*. So Basic exchangers. which transfer 12 heat per side, is probably more economical.


    However, there's a cute trick we can pull here... Component Heat Vents.


    Basically, they cool off everything around them 4/tic. If we have them surrounded, that's a potential 16/tic cooling per each. That's overtwice what Basic vents do, AND don't require exchangers. Plus, they're relatively inexpensive, at a mere 4 tin and 4 iron bars on top of your basic vent.


    So now we're looking at some kind of checkerboard pattern of component heat vents, with your heated up coolant cells interspersed.


    Something like this would have 108 cooling at maximum capacity. Only two cells would have 8 cooling/tic, most of them would have 12/tic, and two lucky ones have a coolant of 16/tic. It turns out an average of 12/tic per square.


    It'll be just over 50 copper, 40 tin and just under 100 iron to produce this cooling tower. A bit heavy on the iron, but it doesn't require any gold or diamonds.


    Viable? Depends on your iron. However, this is a static cost, rather than a recurring cost.


    Right, so just over 100 heat dissipated per tic per tower.


    Now, let us look at cost effectiveness at a big coolant tower like this one.


    This bad boy cools off some 336 heat per tic. However, it also requires 244 copper, 112 tin, and a whopping 273 iron.


    It's more efficient on your Iron to build the big boy, but not everyone has that many resources to devote to a cooling tower, so the choice is yours.


    So, these are your coolant towers. A bit pricey on the Iron, Tin, and Copper... but no diamonds and no gold necessary. Now, what are we going to be using these on?


    Well, let's take a look.


    I started with a cute little design.


    1360 Eu/Tic isn't a bad starting point. The 3648 Heat/Tic I'm not so thrilled about, however. That's going to be about eleven of the big coolant towers. That's going to be a significant investment in resources. Now, it could be possible to make it entirely out of UU Matter, but at 5 UU per 4 iron... that's going to be expensive. Copper and Tin are cheaper... 3 UU per 10 metal each.


    So for 12 of these large cooling towers, you'd need 4095 UU for Iron, 879 UU for Copper, and 404 UU for Tin. Unfortunately, producing this much UU would require almost 900 million Eu. So probably not feasible.


    So how do we get this to work? Simple... we don't treat it like a Mk. I reactor and assume we can ablate the entirety of the heat immediately.


    If we build four of the large cooling towers, it turns into a much more manageable 1092 iron, 448 Tin, and 972 Copper. You'll make the EU to produce all that out of your first full cycle.


    That means having a larger number of 60k Coolant Cells in reserve, switching out full ones for empty ones as necessary. Then at the end of the cycle, you wait for the cooling to catch up. Something like a Mk. II reactor.


    Is it resource intensive? Yes (although at least no gold or diamonds were used in the making of this design). But hey, if you really want something that functions like a CASUC? This, or the Condensators, are about as close as you are going to get. The advantage of this system over Condensators is that all the costs are *static*, no components are 'used up', except the uranium cells themselves. You don't go through a chest of Lapis or Redstone every cycle, but you're still producing over 1kEu/tic.


    This is probably cost effective for those who have long-term goals, something to set up as a massive initial investment which will produce dividends over the longer term. This probably also won't be your first setup either. You'll need to be firmly established to get that much UU or Iron. But it just might be your last.

  • Fantastic.


    I have to add something:
    your reactor will run for about 173 seconds, after that the Coolingcells will melt.
    you can easily make a timer with Redpower or any other timer
    setting it to 160 seconds to autoshut the reactor off.


    also you schould consider to put some Reactorheatvents into the Reactor,
    so it can Cool itself if some Heat will get to the Hull

    Change the scheme, alter the mood. Electrify the boys and girls if you'd be so kind.


    [b][i][u][url=' [url='http://forum.industrial-craft.net/index.php?page=Thread&threadID=7745']HAYO CORP: Nuclear Power (FREE: Reactor Blueprints)

  • Fantastic.


    I have to add something:
    your reactor will run for about 173 seconds, after that the Coolingcells will melt.
    you can easily make a timer with Redpower or any other timer
    setting it to 160 seconds to autoshut the reactor off.

    Hmm... that would prevent hull heat buildup during cooling cell exchange.


    So the redpower system would look something like this:


    Timer set to 160 seconds.


    Filter set to pull out all coolant cells.


    Tubes are hooked up to coolant towers as the viable inventory slots for them to go into.


    Once all coolant cells have been removed, coolant cells from a different coolant tower (round robin logic?) are then placed into the reactor.


    Reactor starts up again.


    Quote

    also you schould consider to put some Reactorheatvents into the Reactor,
    so it can Cool itself if some Heat will get to the Hull

    Hmm... the engineer in me agrees with you. While the above *should* prevent hull heat, no engineer relies on *should*. However, every reactor heat vent is one less coolant cell or uranium cell. May have to increase size to accommodate.


    Also, as a question, is it a bug in the designer that a reactor heat vent is not activated, regardless of hull heat, when it is all by itself, not touching any other components?

  • The big question is whether or not this design if more efficient than if you would have spent all those resources on just a few stable reactors. Beside the resources required for the reactor itself, you need additional filters and pipes as well as several spare-coolant cells.

  • Efficient or not, sometimes in Minecraft I like to throw away Efficency and Need and just say "To hell with it, I just want to build that monster" .. and have fun while doing it ;)

  • The big question is whether or not this design if more efficient than if you would have spent all those resources on just a few stable reactors. Beside the resources required for the reactor itself, you need additional filters and pipes as well as several spare-coolant cells.

    That is, of course, the million-Eu/tic question. Honestly, I don't know yet, this is still in the realm of theorycrafting. Hence my caveat at the beginning of my post that this is just thinking out loud and trying ideas well out of the box.


    The immediate advantage I can see with this setup is that it requires no gold or diamonds. Gold, in particular, has always been an Achilles Heel of mine because I have an inordinate fascination with Logistics Pipes and autocrafting. Granted, my Assembly Table has tremendously helped with that, however I'm still leery of using stacks of gold on a reactor system, as i have seen in some build designs.


    Overclocked Vents and Component Heat Exchangers both use gold. And every system setup I've seen uses copious quantities of both of them.


    The other question is if you can get over 1.3kEu/tic out of stable reactors at a lower cost than what I have used here. That's quite a lot of energy output.


    Let's do a bit of cost analysis, shall we?


    I jumped over to the 'official list of good reactors' thread, and used this beast with a production of 420 Eu/tic. You're going to need FOUR of them to match my reactor's output.


    This would be 1264 Iron, 2140 Copper, a mere 260 tin, and 240 Gold.


    The DDoS has a lower iron and gold cost, but a higher Tin and Copper requirements (mostly due to the massive number of coolant cells required).


    Seems to me to be a possibly worthwhile tradeoff. Actual milage may vary, of course.

  • Also if you use the gregtech addon you get He coolant-cells worth 360k thats enough to run ~1/4 of a cycle of quad uran cells before they need replacing. might need more cooling reactors though due to how long they would take to cool down

  • Efficient or not, sometimes in Minecraft I like to throw away Efficency and Need and just say "To hell with it, I just want to build that monster" .. and have fun while doing it ;)

    that's the spirit you need to build something worthwhile in minecraft. we can create worlds where we have infinite resources to build, analyse and improve everything in any way we want. you invest nothing but time and brain, but you'll always gain a lot of experience for it.

    This would be 1264 Iron, 2140 Copper, a mere 260 tin, and 240 Gold.


    The DDoS has a lower iron and gold cost, but a higher Tin and Copper requirements (mostly due to the massive number of coolant cells required).


    Seems to me to be a possibly worthwhile tradeoff. Actual milage may vary, of course.

    that's actually quite promising. i always found those high-value resources like gold, lapis or diamonds to be the real problem when building anything, too. when building a CASUC i always had trouble to gather the resources for the MFSU, cause the CASUC itself was cheap.
    i also thought about researching how to build something with cooling cell circulation, but i didn't feel like trying without RP2.
    just keep it going :thumbsup:

  • ShneekeyTheLost Maybe your comparison of your DDos system and my 420 eu/t reactor isn't the best. Probably because the efficiency is different and the total eu/t is different. Maybe 11 of these + 1 of this vs 8 of these (with 3 extra thick plates per reactor, because they need to be replaced once during the cycle, this way it is fair when comparing the costs of the reactors). Yours cost 5720 copper, 15165 tin and 3047 iron. 8 of the normal reactors cost 4432 copper, 1512 tin, 2472 iron and 272 gold. That is 1288 copper, 13653 tin and 575 iron less, though 272 gold more. That is more or less a fair comparison: both 1360 eu/t, 5.67 efficiency and are both Mk 1 (sort of). Sure, the 272 gold is sort of a lot, but it is a lot cheaper on the copper, tin and even the iron. But its anyone's own choice.

  • ShneekeyTheLost Maybe your comparison of your DDos system and my 420 eu/t reactor isn't the best. Probably because the efficiency is different and the total eu/t is different. Maybe 11 of these + 1 of this vs 8 of these (with 3 extra thick plates per reactor, because they need to be replaced once during the cycle, this way it is fair when comparing the costs of the reactors). Yours cost 5720 copper, 15165 tin and 3047 iron. 8 of the normal reactors cost 4432 copper, 1512 tin, 2472 iron and 272 gold. That is 1288 copper, 13653 tin and 575 iron less, though 272 gold more. That is more or less a fair comparison: both 1360 eu/t, 5.67 efficiency and are both Mk 1 (sort of). Sure, the 272 gold is sort of a lot, but it is a lot cheaper on the copper, tin and even the iron. But its anyone's own choice.

    How did you end up with three times as much iron as I'm actually using?


    1092 iron, 448 Tin, and 972 Copper is what I'm using for my cooling towers.


    The actual reactor itself is 660 Copper, 568 Tin and 44 Iron, plus 48 uranium cells.


    With this setup, I'm producing 1360 eu/tic. So I've actually got you beat on ALL resources.

  • Every single one of your cooling towers uses 273 iron and your power reactor 44, so (273*11+44= ) 3047 iron, (8*309=2472) which is 575 iron more. The copper and tin is way higher for your system because you need a lot of 60k cooling cells.

  • he already has a cooling system for the Coolingcells,
    its not very fast but cost effiecient.

    Change the scheme, alter the mood. Electrify the boys and girls if you'd be so kind.


    [b][i][u][url=' [url='http://forum.industrial-craft.net/index.php?page=Thread&threadID=7745']HAYO CORP: Nuclear Power (FREE: Reactor Blueprints)

  • I already have a cooling unit for this:


    Cool http://www.talonfiremage.pwp.b…neb9uwtvtvirhtrf1az77rfuo your nukes

    Doesnt exactly cools alot. Only 6 per cell and 18 cells can fit in there so thats a poor 114 cooling.


    This one cools 27 cells at a total rate of 372 cooling. Cooling rates per cell vary a bit but the in the worst case its 8. On average it cools 13,77 per cell.


    http://www.talonfiremage.pwp.b…n830vvl68wg3b8wrjt4i4az28

  • Every single one of your cooling towers uses 273 iron and your power reactor 44, so (273*11+44= ) 3047 iron, (8*309=2472) which is 575 iron more. The copper and tin is way higher for your system because you need a lot of 60k cooling cells.

    Why do you have twice as many cooling towers as I have in my build? That's probably where you are getting your numbers wrong.

    Doesnt exactly cools alot. Only 6 per cell and 18 cells can fit in there so thats a poor 114 cooling.


    This one cools 27 cells at a total rate of 372 cooling. Cooling rates per cell vary a bit but the in the worst case its 8. On average it cools 13,77 per cell.


    http://www.talonfiremage.pwp.b…n830vvl68wg3b8wrjt4i4az28

    Ummm... you didn't keep reading and find that design? Although it's only 336 cooling, not 372.

  • Why do you have twice as many cooling towers as I have in my build? That's probably where you are getting your numbers wrong.

    Ummm... you didn't keep reading and find that design? Although it's only 336 cooling, not 372.

    The component coolers are touching the cooling cells 93 times in total. 93*4 = 372 cooling.


    I just made that design in 10 sec by spamming the components in it. Pretty oblivious its the same as in the op since its a good design to cool your stuff.

  • Well, hello everyone. I apologize for the delay, apparently those little gremlins from the Twilight Forest somehow got through the portal and into my reactor chambers with... unpleasant consequences. Fortunately, containment protocol did operate to specifications, therefore the only significant loss was the crew at Reactor Stations 1-4, and the materials of the reactors themselves. Unfortunately, it caused a massive energy surge running back through the system which wiped all data on the project, and the electromagnetic pulse from the nuclear detonation wiped all the backups, so we've been trying to reproduce our efforts and document our findings.


    Since we had to start over, we also started shopping for new manufacturers for components, and GregTech had some very attractive offers which we have decided to take advantage of.


    First off, we have the 360k Helium Coolant Cells, which are six times as efficient as regular cooling cells, which means six times the running speed and that many fewer coolant towers necessary for a full cycle. Fewer coolant exchanges means a higher effective energy output, which is always relevant to our interests.


    Next are the Thorium Cells. While it produces significantly fewer Eu/t, it does so over a longer period of time, and has a LOT less heat. In fact, you can get away with a full cycle, even at five times the lifespan, without needing to recharge the coolant cells, and only needing 3 chambers. You can find the design here. Unfortunately, this also means it produces a distinctly lackluster 224 Eu/t.


    Increasing the amount of Thorium to a five-chamber process and compressing the Thorium together nets you this reactor design, which can run for 70 minutes before needing to cycle, and produces 544 Eu/t, for a grand whopping total of 544 MILLION Eu out of the total cycle. While only able to run 42% of a cycle before needing to swap out coolant cells, this means you only need a single cooling tower. With an efficiency of 5.67, it's not a bad workhorse reactor which is fairly efficient and runs reliably for an extended period of time.


    But what if that isn't enough for you? What if you really want More Power, and to you, that means more EU/t? Well, we've got you covered.


    One option is the three-chamber Plutonium Cell Powerhouse (PCP) Reactor. At a whopping 2240 Eu/t, this baby matches the old CASUC's energy output. You'll want 7 cooling towers to keep up with it, and have a comfortable margin of safety. Each micro-cycle can be up to 22 minutes, which is around 13.44% of a total cycle, so breaking it up into 8 micro-cycles of 12.5% each gives you a generous buffer. While Plutonium is the most difficult fissionable material to obtain, 896 Million Eu from a full cycle is nothing to sneeze at.


    If you are willing to deal with shorter micro-cycles and can get the Plutonium, Ubermensch dispenses a truly amazing 5440 Eu/t. Micro-cycles are around 7.5 minutes, or less than 5% of the total cycle. If you aren't willing to have 20 cooling towers, you will have to have a power down mid-cycle.


    If you want to use bog-standard quad uranium cells, however, that's quite all right with us. This is a great example of our system in action. At 2720 Eu/t, it beats old-school CASUC reactor output, and with a micro-cycle of 17.5 minutes, which is just over 10% of a total cycle, you'll need nine cooling towers to prevent a mid-cycle cooldown period.


    More math:


    Our cooling tower provides approximately 8-16 cooling per tic per cell, depending on where in the reactor it is. This means, unfortunately, that means that each cooling cell can take up to 36.7 minutes to fully recharge, in worst case scenario, and half that in a better case scenario. Some lucky cells might go even faster, 'corner cases' in the reactor are adjacent to heat-producing cells which are only adjacent to two other cells as opposed to ones in the middle of the reactor which are adjacent to 3, thus would not be fully discharged.


    With this in mind, you divide your micro-cycle time by this time to determine how many cooling towers you would need to run this reactor optimally. Thus, the five-chamber Thorium Reactor which produces 544 Eu/t would only need a single cooling tower, since the micro-cycle time is 70 minutes. The bog-standard quad U-cell reactor might be able to get away with two cooling towers, however that would be cutting your margin of error down, and might need a brief cooldown period mid-cycle to accommodate the small additional fraction.


    While we are still developing multi-cooling tower setups, our engineers have stamped the blueprints for a single-cooling-tower system, using RedPower circuitry.


    Single-Tower Automated Cell Transfer (STACT) System:


    You have a Timer attached to a Counter for your countdown mechanism. For example, a Timer of 10 seconds and a Counter set to count down from 5 would net you 50 second interval. This system can be tweaked to meet your reactor's Optimal Micro-Cycle Time Guideline as is set down in your reactor's instruction manual.


    Once the Counter hits 0, it emits a redstone signal to start the whole process.


    Phase one is to disable the reactor, using a State Cell and a NOT gate to keep it off for a pre-defined amount of time sufficient to handle the transfer of cooling cells.


    This also pulses the Filter attached to the reactor to pull all cooling cells out of the reactor, sending them to a Holding Chest. The Filter outputs a specific color tube, which matches the tube attached to the chest, ensuring that they will only go to the chest. While this paint is not necessary for this transaction to take place, it prevents a logjam in the next phase of the cycle.


    That same pulse also hits the filter in the cooling tower which pulls all the cooling cells out of the cooling tower and paints them the same color as the tube attached to the Reactor (different than the one attached to the holding chest). This color IS necessary, because otherwise the Holding Chest would end up being the Nearest Inventory.


    A Repeater is also pulsed, with sufficient delay to clear the tubes before it pulses the filter attached to the holding chest, sending all of the cells into the cooling tower, which has redstone signal continually applied (because it will never blow up due to never having any fissionable materials contained therein). If you wish to push the Safety Margin, this delay can be reduced significantly, as you only need to grab the cooling cells out of the cooling tower for the cooling tower to be the only available inventory for the cells to go into.


    Once the cells have entered the cooling tower, the state cell attached to the NOT gate lapses, and the reactor continues to function with fresh cells.


    Please note that it is ALWAYS recommended (though not strictly necessary for this setup) that you install Nuclear Control components with a kill-switch connected to a temperature reader in the event of an uncontrolled reaction. Small temporal fluctuations in the fabric of reality (i.e. server tick lag) could cause significant heat buildup without warning, and your reactor design should take this into consideration.


    ShneekeyCraft LLC is not responsible for damages caused by improper maintenance or testing of mechanisms prior to going 'hot', or by insufficient safety kill-switches being installed. Viewer discression is advised. Void where prohibited by law. Women who are or may become pregnant should not subject themselves to radioactive materials for any length of time to avoid certain birth defects (known collectively as 'x-gene factors'). If your micro-cycle time exceeds four hours without explosion, consult your local nuclear physicist immediately (so we can figure out how the hell you did it).

    The post was edited 2 times, last by ShneekeyTheLost: Math and blueprints for RP2 cell-transposing system included ().

  • New and Improved Designs!


    Six-Chamber Cooling Chamber: Six Shooter


    Improvements: Reactor Plating blocking 'corner cases'


    The cooling towers are an amazing piece of engineering, however they do have one crippling weakness: We aren't looking at total heat drained, we're looking at how much heat per cell is drained of per tick. There's exactly two places in the design where a water cell could be placed which only had a cooling efficiency of 8/tic, the two in the bottom corners. Because of this, safety protocol demanded we calculate the cooling of all cells by this amount, to be sure that every cell was topped off, when most of the cells would be completely cool in half to three quarters of the time.


    The reactor plates can be replaced with any non-functional component. Their only use is to block those slots and prevent such 'corner cases', improving overall efficiency by 50%! This means you can calculate cooling times at 12H/t without risking blowing your reactor. For a standard HAYOish 60k Coolant Cell, this works out to 4 minutes and ten seconds (60k/12=5k ticks/20=250 seconds/60=4.167). It also comes included with 24 cooling cells. This exact amount is absolutely required for the following reactors, and the empty space is likewise essential for this system to function flawlessly. Since it is a 12H/t slot, it doesn't really affect the performance of the cooling tower in the least.


    DDoS Generator
    Type A


    This is a work-horse generator, producing 1120 EU/t and an efficiency of 4.67. While not the most efficient design, it is at least able to produce a significant amount of power output. Best of all, with a micro-cycle time of 8 minutes and change, you only need a single cooling tower to keep it going!


    Type B


    At 2720 EU/t, this generator will beat any old-school CASUC's power output, the efficiency of 5.67 isn't too shabby either. However, with a micro-cycle time of just shy of 3 minutes, you will need a second tower to keep it cool unless you are willing to permit a mid-cycle cooldown period of approximately one minute per micro-cycle. We are still working on the engineering challenges of a round-robin cooling cell system, therefore this is in experimental stage only.


    Type GBH


    This is a hybrid variant of the above, using GregTech Thorium Cells. By doing this, you increase the micro-cycle time to precisely match the micro-cycle time of your cooling tower, meaning you only need one, and still having an active output of 1184 EU/t. You will need to manually replace the Quad-Uranium Cells four times over the life cycle of this generator, due to the exceptional life expectancy of Thorium.


    Type GBT


    This is the pure Thorium version of the above. While you won't need to continuously replace spent Uranium cells, the overall output is reduced to 544 EU/t, although it still produces 544M EU over its life cycle. This system has a significant amount of redundancy built into the timing, as your micro-cycle is over twice the cooling cycle of your Six Shooter. A good, conservative setup for the first-time user of DDOS systems who have access to GregTech components.


    Type GAP


    This three-chamber reactor provides 2240 EU/t, however it requires the rare and expensive GregTech Quad-Plutonium Cells. With a micro-cycle time of just over three and a half minutes, you will need at least a half a minute of cooldown per micro-cycle to keep up with the cooling tower, unless you have a second one installed.


    Type GBP


    The ultimate in EU output, transmits a stunning 5440 EU/t, AND has an Efficiency of 5.67. However, the cycle time of 80 Seconds means you will need 4 Six Shooters to keep it fully cooled, or 3 if you are willing to accept a cooldown period per micro-cycle. And, of course, figuring out how to get your hands on 24 Quad-Plutonium Cells is YOUR problem, we only provide design schematics.


    Using 360k Helium Cooling Cells in any of these reactor systems will increase both micro-cycle time and cooling tower time by a factor of six, but will not alter how many cooling towers are actually necessary, since both sides of the equation are increased identically. Having said that, fewer cycles means less downtime, so for those who find themselves with Helium cells as a byproduct of their industrial facility, it can be a viable alternative.

  • Quick question - your post implies that the filter can pull all the cooling cells out in one redstone pulse, is that right? If so, how did you 'stack' the filter with cooling cells, since they don't stack? Or do you pulse the filter the required number of times (which is all I can figure here, but maybe I'm missing something or it's a versioning issue with IC2/RP?).

  • Quick question - your post implies that the filter can pull all the cooling cells out in one redstone pulse, is that right? If so, how did you 'stack' the filter with cooling cells, since they don't stack? Or do you pulse the filter the required number of times (which is all I can figure here, but maybe I'm missing something or it's a versioning issue with IC2/RP?).

    You pulse a state cell connected to a timer to pulse twenty-four times, yes. Initial testing has shown that setting the state cell to 24 seconds with a timer rate of 1s is sufficient to move them.


    Also, I've got an idea for a primitive round-robin system in which the cooling towers and generator tower are set up in serial rather than in tandem. So the filter on the generator tower moves to Cooling Tower 1, the cells in Cooling Tower 1 goes to Cooling Tower 2, etc until Cooling Tower x(the last) feeds back to the generator tower.